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Evolution of childbirth: Wider hips don't make locomotion easier, so why is labor so hard?
A new study found no connection between hip width and efficient locomotion, and suggests that scientists have long approached the problem in the wrong way. "This idea, that pelvic width for birth and pelvic width for locomotion are connected, is deeply ingrained in this discipline," said the first author of the study. "Everyone thinks they know this is true...but it's wrong, and it's wrong for two reasons. First, the way we had modeled the forces
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313094557.htm
180. Wider hips don't make locomotion easier, so why is labor so hard? [Forum/Discussion]
from: Administrator (office@fertaid.com), Australia on 17/03/2015 12:35:38 AM Profession:
Comment: First up I am not an pediatrician or Obstetrician but I thought this article was enlightening. I like studies that overturn existing viewpoints.
Submission: The article by Anna G. Warrener,et. al has examined if wider hips mean slower movement and found that it did not. In other words, the argument that evolution has always been a compromise between the width of the pelvis and the size of the baby where the width of the pelvis was limited to walking/running speed. The authors project that the real problem is not the width of the hips but the size of the baby. Historically, this relationship may have been in balance but in more recent times, diet has not been limiting and the size of the baby has been growing disproportionately to hip size. Which leads one to speculate that the current size of babies is atypical and by extension, the normal range of babies may not reflect the evolutionary profile. Could small for gestational age now reflect a normal range in our historical past. Does the current diet or available energy commit more women to surgical deliveries. Interesting thought bubble!!
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